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ENG1100 College Writing: Accessing Library Resources

English, introductory research, citing sources

Locating Background Information

Credo Reference

The Credo Reference database is a portal to over 780 full-text reference titles from over 80 major publishers. 

Points of View Reference Center  

Full-text database designed to provide multiple sides of a variety of current issues

Locating News Articles

 

ProQuest Newsstream offers full-text news from over 1,280 sources, including domestic and foreign newspapers, wire services, magazines, trade publications, and blogs. Over 50 of the highest-circulation newspapers in the United States are included in the database, including such key titles as the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times.

Locating Articles

You can access databases from the Library homepage by clicking on Databases. Since there are more than 125 databases, we are highlighting two of our general databases. 

ProQuest Central is a large multidisciplinary database indexing over 14,000 publications, the majority of them available in full text. 

Academic Search Complete includes more than 8500 periodicals (newspapers, magazines and journals) in all subject areas. Most articles are available full-text online.‚Äč

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) recently endorsed the Framework for Information Literacy which are based on the following six concepts. 

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual

  • Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required. 
     

Information Creation as a Process

  • Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. The iterative processes of researching, creating, revising, and disseminating information vary, and the resulting product reflects these differences.

 
Information Has Value

  • Information possesses several dimensions of value, including as a commodity, as a means of education, as a means to influence, and as a means of negotiating and understanding the world. Legal and socioeconomic interests influence information production and dissemination.

 
Research as Inquiry

  • Research is iterative and depends upon asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry in any field.

 
Scholarship as Conversation

  • Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations.

 
Searching as Strategic Exploration

  • Searching for information is often nonlinear and iterative, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops.

 

Finding Books & Media

To find books and media that our library owns, use the Books & Media tab on our homepage, or search for everything with the Search All option.

Start with one or two keywords, adding quotation marks ("") around concepts with more than one word: for example, "middle school" or "autism spectrum disorder"... quotes are not needed for single words, such as education or science.

Narrow your results using the limits on the right side of the results page.  You may see a lot of non-book items, so be sure to limit the Resource Type category to Books, if that's what you're looking for.

When you've found a book (or ebook!) that looks interesting, click the title to learn more about it, or (if it's Available), write down the location and call number and head to the shelves to get it!

If you see 'Available Online', the book or media is available online!

Search Tip: Keywords

It is usually a good idea to start out broadly, so using just one or two of your topic terms is a good way to begin. Once you have a set of results, you can begin narrowing down your results by entering one or more terms. Searching in a specific field such as "Subject" or "Title" will narrow or focus your results. 

Search Tip: Thesaurus or Subject

Sometimes keywords that worked well in one database won’t be as effective in another.  If you find that your results are a bit scattered, try using that database’s terminology:  the Thesaurus or Subject Terms link.  Many databases have a list of designated words that are used to summarize a topic, but they may not be obvious to you.